80’s movie director John Hughes honored at Oscars

The Oscars took a moment for a tribute to the late John Hughes Sunday night. Hughes’ tribute was introduced by Matthew Broderick and Molly Ringwald.

The montage of great Hughes moments was followed by a handful of his most famous leading actors talking about the writing and directing legend.

On stage were actors and actresses who played roles in Hughe’s movies, some of which are considered members of the 80’s brat pack: Anthony Michael Hall, Macaulay Culkin, Jon Cryer, Ally Sheedy and Judd Nelson, and each told a Hughes anecdote. Hughes’ family was in the audience and stood to thunderous applause.

Ringwald told the audience that at 16, “Hughes saw something in me that I didn’t see in myself.” Broderick continued that a day doesn’t go by that someone doesn’t tap him on the shoulder and ask “Hey Ferris, is this your day off?”

The moving montage showed key sequences from comedies that Hughes had written and directed, including ‘Sixteen Candles,’ ‘The Breakfast Club,’ ‘National Lampoon’s Vacation,’ ‘Some Kind of Wonderful,’ ‘Pretty in Pink,’ ‘Home Alone‘ and ‘Planes, Trains and Automobiles.’

One thought on “80’s movie director John Hughes honored at Oscars”

  1. Interesing blog. A key to understanding Hughes’ work is knowing the distinction between Generation X and Generation Jones (between the Boomers and Xers). Many of his films were about GenJones characters, and many in the Brat Pack were GenJonesers. This was sometimes confusing, since the same actors sometimes played GenXers (Breakfast Club) and sometimes GenJonesers (St. Elmos’s Fire) within the same year.

    Google Generation Jones, and you’ll see it’s gotten lots of media attention, and many top commentators from many top publications and networks (Washington Post, Time magazine, NBC, Newsweek, ABC, etc.) now specifically use this term. In fact, the Associated Press’ annual Trend Report chose the Rise of Generation Jones as the #1 trend of 2009. I found this page helpful because it gives a pretty good overview of recent media interest in GenJones: http://generationjones.com/2009latest.html

    It is important to distinguish between the post-WWII demographic boom in births vs. the cultural generations born during that era. Generations are a function of the common formative experiences of its members, not the fertility rates of its parents. And most analysts now see generations as getting shorter (usually 10-15 years now), partly because of the acceleration of culture. Many experts now believe it breaks down more or less this way:

    DEMOGRAPHIC boom in babies: 1946-1964
    Baby Boom GENERATION: 1942-1953
    Generation Jones: 1954-1965
    Generation X: 1966-1978

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