Tag Archives: Pac-man

15 retired back-to-school supplies you miss

Pac-man thermos lunchbox

I think I see some 80’s back-to-school references in this trending topic from Mashable on Twitter this morning… What other 80’s back-to-school items do YOU miss?

15 retired back-to-school supplies you miss

 

Ready for the world’s biggest Pac-Man game?!

Forget Google’s tribute to the dot-gobbling yellow orb. If you’ve got the time, and you’ll need a lot of time, Soap Creative (the designers of the official Pac-Man website) has created a monster of a Pac-Man board. World’s Biggest Pac-Man is a modern twist on an age old classic.

It has been labeled “and internet hit”, the Word’s Biggest Waste of time and time wasting brilliance. All of which Soap Creative are happy about.

Fans have helped created more than 12,600 interlocking mazes. Players can play on multiple mazes in a single game. The exits that let you zoom to the other side of a maze in the original version of the game transport you to the next maze in this one.

The project grew out of a collaboration between Namco and Microsoft Australia, and uses HTML5, the emerging tool for building web applications (and the latest version of HTML, the most popular coding language).

Totally Tubular ’80s Toys: Taking 80’s toys ‘to the max’

Totally Tubular '80s ToysLove toys? Love toys from the decade of the 80’s even more? Well, do we have a book for you! Whether you’re a collector, reconnecting with your childhood or simply a toy fanatic who wasn’t even born in the 1980s, you’ll love Totally Tubular 80’s Toys.

Totally Tubular 80’s Toys is filled with super rad toys and bodacious memories, Totally Tubular ’80s Toys  is a righteous ride back in time when Madonna ruled and Spinal Tap amplifiers went to 11. You’ll find everything from He-Man to Cabbage Patch Kids, Trivial Pursuit to Rubik’s Cube, Transformers to Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, and Pac-Man to Mario Bros Donkey Kong-as well as lots of fun and smiles.

You’ll enjoy:

  • A Year-by-year look at the greatest toys of the ’80s
  • Awesome color photos featuring more than 500 fabulous toys and period shots of the people who made the decade gnarly
  • Lists of the top 10 TV shoes, movies, and music for each year

About the Author:

A child of the ’80s, Mark Bellomo is an enthusiastic and passionate toy collector, and one of the leading toy authorities in the country. Bellomo has authored a number of books, including Transformers: Identification and Price Guide and two editions of The Ultimate Guide to G.I. Joe, 1982-1994, published by F+W Media.

Where to buy:

80’s arcade game Pac-Man turns 30!

PacmanThe pop-culture sensation, released in Japan 30 years ago this week, created millions of glazed-eye addicts and spawned more than 400 products, including a cartoon, a breakfast cereal and a hit song.

Many credit Pac-Man, an iconic symbol of the ’80s, with expanding video gaming to a wider audience.

The original arcade classic was imagined by Namco developer Toru Iwatani in 1979, although it didn’t reach the U.S until the fall of 1980. As the legend goes, Iwatani was inspired by his partially eaten pizza pie and turned it into a gaming character: a big yellow dot that gobbled up smaller dots, and avoided four deadly ghosts, as it careened through a maze.

It took eight people 15 months to complete the orginal Japanese game, which was slightly different than the versions people would later play overseas. The ghosts were initially called monsters, and Pac-Man ate cookies instead of the familiar dots. Even his name was changed once he crossed the Pacific Ocean.

Developers also created the four colorful ghosts, Pinky, Blinky, Inky and Clyde, with distinct personalities. For example, Blinky likes to chase while Pinky lurks in ambush. It was a novel concept in gaming that wasn’t being developed at that time.

Pac-Man was licensed for distribution in the U.S. by Midway, a division of Bally, and it reached American shores in October 1980, at a time when shooter games such as Space Invaders ruled the arcades.

Its light-hearted originality and simplicity — players needed only to move a joystick — made it an immediate hit. Some speculated that Pac-Man became popular in bars in part because gamers needed only one hand to play and could hold a drink in the other.

In the first 15 months after its release in the U.S., Namco sold more than 100,000 arcade units, while fans spent more than $1 billion in quarters to fuel what would become known as “Pac-Man fever.”

Pac-Man’s appeal to kids was reinforced by a Saturday-morning animated TV series and a breakfast cereal with marshmallow ghosts. In all, Pac-Man has been licensed to more than 250 companies for products ranging from air fresheners to bed sheets to costumes.

An unlicensed sequel, Ms. Pac-Man, followed in 1981. Namco soon embraced the game and adopted it as an official title. In all, more than 30 official spin-offs, plus numerous clones, were inspired by Pac-Man’s success.

“Pac-Man Fever,” a novelty song by Jerry Buckner and Gary Garcia, reached No. 9 on the Billboard pop chart in early 1982.

Although the game is far removed from its 1980s heyday, Pac-Man’s appeal continues to endure.

In 1999, Billy Mitchell of Florida became the first player to achieve a perfect Pac-Man score — 3,333,360. And versions of the game remain popular on the iPhone and iPod Touch.

Google’s logo, which often changes to reflect events of the day, became a playable Pac-Man game on Friday, spelling out the company’s name. A Google spokeswoman said the game will be available over the weekend and gameplay reaches 256 levels.

Namco’s Hisatsune believes Pac-Man’s combination of cute characters and cat-and-mouse gameplay are at the core of its popularity. He also thinks Pac-Man’s biggest legacy will be its pioneering status as the first game to appeal broadly to men and women.

Some even attribute today’s wide variety of video games to Pac-Man’s acceptance in the culture.

Source: CNN

Find Pacman games @ Amazon.com